M87′s Obese Black Hole: A Step Closer to the Event Horizon Telescope

The black hole lurking inside galaxy M87 has a mass of 6.6 billion suns, according to today's announcement (NASA)

Fresh from the Department Of I Really Shouldn’t Have Eaten That Last Binary, astronomers attending the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, Wash., have announced a supermassive black hole residing inside the nearby galaxy M87 has a weight problem.

In fact, this galactic behemoth is obese.

With a mass of 6.6 billion suns, it is the biggest black hole in our cosmic neighborhood. “It’s almost on top of us, relatively speaking. Fifty million light-years — that’s our backyard effectively. To have one so large, that’s kind of extreme,” astronomer Karl Gebhardt, with the University of Texas at Austin, told Discovery News. The black hole’s mass was arrived at after Gebhardt’s team tracked the motions of the stars near the black hole using the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii. By analyzing the stars’ orbits, the mass of the black hole could be calculated.

Although it’s been known for some time that M87′s black hole might be slightly on the heavy side, 6.6 billion solar masses exceeds previous estimates.

Previously on Astroengine, I’ve discussed the exciting possibility of imaging a black hole’s event horizon. Radio astronomers have even modeled what they might see should a collection of telescopes participate in event horizon astronomy. Naturally, to see the shadow of an event horizon, the black hole a) needs to be massive, and b) relatively close. The first nearby supermassive black hole that comes to mind is our very own Sagittarius A* (Sag. A*) that camps out in the middle of the Milky Way. That would be a good place to point our first event horizon telescope, right?

Think again. Even before astronomers were able to pinpoint M87′s black hole mass, in 2009, researchers from the Max Planck Institute and University of Texas had estimated M87′s mass to be 6.4 billion suns. Although M87 is a whopping 2,000 times further away from Earth than Sag. A*, due to its mass, the M87 supermassive black hole event horizon shadow should appear bigger in the sky than Sag. A*’s. Today’s announcement is bound to stimulate efforts in the quest to directly image a black hole’s event horizon for the first time.

“Right now we have no evidence that an object is a black hole. Within a few years, we might be able to image the shadow of the event horizon,” Gebhardt added.

For more on today’s news, read Irene Klotz’s report on Discovery News: “Obese Black Hole Lurks in Our Cosmic Backyard

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5 responses to “M87′s Obese Black Hole: A Step Closer to the Event Horizon Telescope

  1. thanks for your insight. i didn’t even know this sight existed until today when i saw it in one of your comments about the M87 B.H. i.m gonna go to the naked singularity story now that should be great! thanks again! woohoo

  2. Wow amazing!!
    A mass of 6.6 BILLION stars! Thats pretty extraordinary!
    I find black holes very interesting, and at a young age, i developed my own theory about black holes, white holes and wormholes.
    Scientists have predicted that there are many more black holes outside of our galaxy and universe that have not been discovered yet. Having a black hole in the M87 galaxy which is…”near” to us, is amazing and has opened up many interests and assignments for many astronomers and astronomy fanatics, just like myself.

    Thanks for another wonderful insight!

  3. I can see that you are a professional at your area! I am starting a webpage soon, and your tips will be very useful for me. Thanks for all your support and wishing you all the success in your business.

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